Hoos Barley

Objective
The aim was to test the effects of different inorganic fertilizers (supplying the elements N, P, K Mg and sodium silicate) and farmyard manure (FYM) on the yield of spring barley.
Farm operation data?
Sample archive?
Samples available?
 
Data Access Statement
Available to any researcher on request
Data license
No data license
Data URL
http://www.era.rothamsted.ac.uk/Hoosfield
Data policy
Yes (not online)
Organizations
People

Site: Hoosfield

Type
research station field
Location
Harpenden
Hertfordshire
United Kingdom
Geographic location
51.81206, -0.37608
© OpenStreetMap contributors
Elevation
130 Metres
Visits permitted?
Yes
Visiting arrangements
Contact Andy Macdonald
History
The Continuous Spring Barley experiment was started in 1852 on a 1.7 hectare (4.25 acre) site on Hoosfield, to test the effects of organic manure and inorganic fertilizer on the growth of spring barley. The site has probably been occupied since Roman times, and the Rothamsted map of 1623 shows the site under arable cultivation. Arable crops were grown 1847-1851 (Poulton, 1997).

Design period:

Crop
CropYears grown
barley 1852—