Wooster Long-term Tillage Experiment

This experiment has been added by the GLTEN Curators using existing published sources.
Objective
Unknown
Data Access Statement
Don't know
Data license
Don't know
Data policy
Don't know
Organizations
College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, Wooster
research organisation
Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center
research organisation
People

Site: LTE Site

Type
research farm
Location
Wooster
Ohio
USA
Geographic location
40.77336, -81.911486
© OpenStreetMap contributors
Visits permitted?
No
Soil description
The soils are Wooster (fine-loamy, mixed, active, mesic, Oxyaquic Fragiudalf) and Riddles (fine-loamy, mixed, active, mesic Typic Hapludalf) series
Climate description
Precipitation during the growing season is generally inadequate for maximum crop yields due to frequent drought stress during the months of June, July, and August. Rainfall events can be erosive due to the high intensity of the storms that lead to excessive water and soil runoff.
Climate properties
VariableTime periodValue (range)Units
precipitation905 millimeter
air temperature9.1 degree Celsius

Design period: (1962—)

Design Type
Randomized complete block design
Design description
Plots measure 22.3 × 4.3 m
Number of replicates
3
Crops
CropYears grown
maize
soybeans
Crop Rotations
continuous corn
  • 1
    maize
corn-soybean
  • 1
    maize
  • 2
    soybeans
Factor
Factor name
Factor levels
tillage process
no-till
No pre-planting tillage operations.
minimum tillage  (20-25 cm depth)
Application frequency: annually in spring
Application method: chisel plough
Soil not inverted by ploughing. Approximately 30% of crop residue is retained on the surface.
conventional tillage  (20-25 cm depth)
Application frequency: annually in spring
Application method: mouldboard plough
Soil inverted by ploughing. Approximately 100% of crop residue is incorporated into the soil.
Measurements
VariableMaterialUnitsFrequencyScaleComment
grain yield traitAll crops
soil propertiesAll crops

Related publications

  • Mestelan, S., Smeck, N., Sprunger, C., Dyck, A., & Dick, W. (2021). Four decades of continuously applied tillage or no-tillage on soil properties and soil morphology. Agrosyst Geosci Environ, 4:e20195.
  • Kumar, S., Kadono, A., Lal, R. and Dick, W. (2012), Long-Term Tillage and Crop Rotations for 47–49 Years Influences Hydrological Properties of Two Soils in Ohio. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 76: 2195-2207.