Laelatu wooded meadow fertilisation experiment

This experiment has been added by the GLTEN Curators using existing published sources.
Local identifier
NATURA 2000 code 6530
Years operational
1961—
Objective
The impact of nutrient application on the yield of herbaceous biomass and proportion between functional groups in a wooded meadow, semi-natural grassland.
Description
The fertilisation experiment was initiated in 1961 on three randomly selected 10 × 30 m plots per treatment in the continuously managed part of the Laelatu wooded meadow. Until 1981, three different fertilisation loads (0N:26P:50 K, 35N:26P:50 K and 100N:26P:50 K) were used annually on fixed plots, and three plots remained unfertilised throughout the experiment. Nitrogen was applied in two portions: one in spring and one after mowing in July; P and K were spread in autumn only. Mowing was done in early July each year, and the hay was removed.
Data Access Statement
Don't know
Data license
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Data policy
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Organization
Estonian Seminatural Community Conservation Association
People

Site: Laelatu wooded meadow fertilisation experiment

Local code
NATURA 2000 code 6530
Location
Western Estonia
Estonia
Geographic location
58.600583, 23.631522
© OpenStreetMap contributors
Visits permitted?
No
History
This wooded meadow has probably been used for haymaking for more than 200 years, with no record of grazing.
Soil type
leptosol
Soil description
rendzic leptosol with a hummus layer lying on limestone shingle mixed with coastal sediments
Soil properties
VariableDepthValue (range)UnitsRef yearEstimated?Baseline?
pH 7
hummus layer17 – 20 Centimetres9.2 Percent
Climate properties
VariableTime periodValue (range)Units
mean air temperature July17 degree Celsius
mean air temperature January-5 degree Celsius
average annual precipitation500 millimeter

Design period: From initiation in 1961 (1961—)

Description
The fertilisation experiment was initiated in 1961 on three randomly selected 10 × 30 m plots per treatment in the continuously managed part of the Laelatu wooded meadow. Until 1981, three different fertilisation loads (0N:26P:50 K, 35N:26P:50 K and 100N:26P:50 K) were used annually on fixed plots, and three plots remained unfertilised throughout the experiment (Table 1). Nitrogen was applied in two portions: one in spring and one after mowing in July; P and K were spread in autumn only. Mowing was done in early July each year, and the hay was removed.
Crop
CropYears grown
grass
Factors
Factor name
Factor levels
nitrogen fertilizer exposure
Nitrogen applied in two portions: one in spring and one after mowing in July.
N35  (35 kgN/ha)
N100  (100 kgN/ha)
phosphate fertilizer exposure
P spread in autumn only
P26  (26 kgP/ha)
potassium fertilizer exposure
K spread in autumn only
K50  (50 kgK/ha)
Factor combinations
Control
no fertilizer exposure
PK
phosphorous and potassium fertilizer exposure
phosphate fertilizer exposure: P26
potassium fertilizer exposure: K50
PKN1
phosphorous, potassium and low nitrogen fertilizer exposure
phosphate fertilizer exposure: P26
potassium fertilizer exposure: K50
nitrogen fertilizer exposure: -
PKN2
phosphorous, potassium and high nitrogen fertilizer exposure
phosphate fertilizer exposure: P26
potassium fertilizer exposure: K50
nitrogen fertilizer exposure: N100
Measurements
VariableMaterialUnitsFrequencyScaleComment
plant biomassNot specifiedAll fieldwork was conducted in the second half of June. After cutting, the biomass samples were transported to the nearby laboratory and sorted by species. After being dried in an oven at 80–85 °C for 24 h, the dry biomass was weighed.
functional group ratiosNot specifiedTo determine functional group ratios, the biomass of the various plant species was divided into grasses, sedges & rushes (subsequently labelled sedges), legumes and other herbaceous species (subsequently labelled forbs).

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